History

What has been written about our Badl:

J. N. Tinkhauser’s ‘Brunecker Chronik’ – 1834

“The spa in Mühlbach above Gaiß has been very much praised but it still offers bad accommodation”

 

Niederweger Chronik

“In this valley there is a spring you can bathe in and which is visited by few people in high summer but where you can’t find proper accommodation but just a shabby hut.”


Beda Weber – das Land Tirol – ein Handbuch für Reisende – Wagner’sche Buchhandlung 1883 (Beda Weber – the county Tyrol – a guide book for travellers – Wagner bookshop 1883)

“The spa is an hour away from the church. The path which leads to it is rough and steep, so even riding on it is tiring. The best place to start is Uttenheim and you can walk or ride across the so-called Ainsberg. The place itself consists of a modest alpine hut and the food consists of whatever the guest brings along. It is certainly the simplest spa in the Tyrol but also the most convenient one. The locals like visiting it and feeling the benefits of its water. The fresh mountain air certainly contributes also to its healing effects. It belongs to the chalybeate water.”


Tirol und Vorarlberg topografisch, mit geschichtlichen Bemerkungen von Johann Jakob Staffler, II. Band – Innsbruck 1844. (Topography of the Tyrol and Vorarlberg with historical annotations by Johann Jakob Staffler, II volume – Innsbruck 1844)

“About ¾ of an hour from the church of Mühlbach there is the Mühlbach Spa on a steep alpine hill. Only a short while ago it was very basic (whoever wanted to use the spa had to bring everything they needed themselves) but now accommodation and food are very satisfactory. The water of the spring, though without minerals, is very cold and pure, therefore fortifying. Many people like visiting the spa because of the excellent effects of its water, although quite often visitors have been driven away by ankle-deep snow in the middle of the summer.”


Adolph Schaubach – Handbuch für Reisende durch das mittlere und südliche Tyrol – 1850 – Jena ( Adolph Schaubach – Guide for travellers in Central and Southern Tyrol – 1850 – Jena)


“…about an hour away there is the Mühlbach Spa, chalybeate water, used by people from the country especially since the cholera.”


Neue deutsche Alpenzeitung – Wien, 20.01.1877 – Drei Ausflüge in die Rieserfernergruppe – von Dr. J. Daimer in Taufers (Vienna, 20.01.1877 – three excursions into the Rieserfernergroup – by Dr. J. Daimer in Taufers)

“…finally we saw the Mühlbacher Spa. A small number of visitors, farmers from the area, could be found near the building or resting on the grass outside, relaxing from the strain of not doing anything… I don’t know the ingredients of the water. An old document mentions its aluminium oxide and iron content. Apparently its effects are better than the ones from other waters in the Puster valley and is renowned for its positive effects on digestion and rheumatic pains, especially in the legs. However, not everyone benefits from its effects. For some the water is too strong, they have to leave before their health has improved. These are the results of many years of experience of the people from the valley.”
“…There can hardly be a better place for a health resort. 1755 m above sea level, surrounded by resinous forests it has all the good requirements a place like that needs. There aren’t many visitors because weak people are incapable of walking uphill for two hours and those people who are strong enough for the walk don’t really need the spa. Therefore sometimes you meet healthy and strong people who spend some time at the spa to get even stronger so they won’t fall ill in the winter.”


Johann Kammerer in der Wochenzeitung “Pustertaler Bote” – 1905 (Johann Kammerer in the weekly paper “Pustertaler Bote” – 1905)


“…the Mühlbacher Spa which has got a great reputation around the world has improved a lot over the years and now they can serve meals fit for a king.”


Kaiserfeier am 18.08.1905 auch im Bad Mühlbach: - 25.08.1905 Pustertaler Bote (Celebration for the emperor in the Mühlbach Spa on 18.08.1905: - 25.08.1905 Pustertaler Bote)


“Citizens of Brunopolis – come up here and don’t forget to bring along the ‘Tonfirma Mascher’ (Mascher’s sound company)” (Mister Mascher played the violine, Mister Wagger the zither)


Vinzenz Oberhollenzer – Die Tauferer und die Tölderer (people from two valleys in that area) – Reinmichls Volkskalender 1968

“About an hour from the village is the Badl, where many people used to go to find a cure for their illnesses. It is 1700 m above sea level and hence the highest in the country. Nowadays it is open in the summer only and a popular inn.”


Josef Rampold – Pustertal – Landschaft, Geschichte und Gegenwart an Drau, Rienz and Ahr – 1972 (the Puster valley – area, history and present time of places near the rivers Drau, Rienz and Ahr)


“The Mühlbacher Badl (1694 m) used to be very famous, it was the highest spa of that kind in the Puster valley, a typical and traditional ‘farmer’s spa’ where people from Bruneck used to go; it was an amusing mix of a spa ( bathing in wooden barrels) and life on an alpine meadow which according to the general opinion has a somewhat relaxed moral code.
Already Beda Weber (author and statesman) and Staffler (author and topographer) praised this spa but unfortunately it burned down some years ago and is not being used anymore and the chapel (18th century) is becoming dilapidated.


Hermann Frass/Franz H. Riedl – Heilbäder und Heilwässer (spas) in Südtirol (South Tyrol) – 1979

“According to Beda Weber the most basic and cheapest spa in the Tyrol in 1838 was the popular Mühlbach Spa (1695 m) in a valley which could be reached from the two places Gais and Tesselberg. It was a typical and traditional farmer’s spa, unfortunately it burned down some years ago and was not used as a spa anymore. The water had a healing effect especially on the digestive tract.”


Josef Innerhofer – “Taufers Ahrn Prettau” – Die Geschichte eines Tales, 1980 (the history of a valley)

“Josef Oberbrugger from Mühlen (1829-1860) has confirmed himself as a non-medical practitioner. In the register of deaths of Uttenheim he is mentioned as the doctor in attendance three times. During his period of office the chapel of the Mühlbach spa was rebuilt. This famous spa is about an hour’s walk from the village and is the highest spa in the Puster valley (1694 m). Once there was a cheerful mix of spa life and the typical life on an alpine meadow. Maybe that was due to the joie de vivre of the locals…
The healing effects of the water - especially on the digestive tract - were highly praised. The people, however, had to provide their own food and drink. In 1967 the spa burned down”



“Josef Oberbrugger from Mühlen (1829-1860) has confirmed himself as a non-medical practitioner. In the register of deaths of Uttenheim he is mentioned as the doctor in attendance three times. During his period of office the chapel of the Mühlbach spa was rebuilt. This famous spa is about an hour’s walk from the village and is the highest spa in the Puster valley (1694 m). Once there was a cheerful mix of spa life and the typical life on an alpine meadow. Maybe that was due to the joie de vivre of the locals…
The healing effects of the water - especially on the digestive tract - were highly praised. The people, however, had to provide their own food and drink. In 1967 the spa burned down”

SüdTirol – Bergwerke Höhlen Heilquellen (mines, caves and spas)– Herber Kuntschner – 1990

“The Mühlbach Spa (1695 m). – The place lies in the north-east of the village Gais in the Mühlbach valley. There was a spa which was very popular in the last century and which had water that contained iron and traces of radioactivity 39, Bq/I partial analyses 1982 of LLBZ nr. 10.531-32 show that it is oligomineral water: R/180°90, HCO, 42,0 SO 10,2, traces of iron, mg/kg.”